Monday, October 16, 2017

Fairfield Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Greenville County Probate Records

Greenville, SCGreenville, SCGreenville County originally belonged to the Cherokee Indians, until 1777 when they ceded their lands to the state and English and Scotch-Irish settlers began settling. Greenville District was created in 1786, but from 1791 to 1800 it was part of the larger Washington District. The county seat was originally named Pleasantburg, but in 1831 the name was changed to Greenville. Early settlers: Arnold Russell, William Henry Lyttleton, Frederick Winter, Jesse Saxon, John Robinson, Evan Thomas, George Salmon, Wiat Anderson, John Holland, General Nathaniel Greene (1742-1786) and others.

Greenville County Probate Records available to members of South Carolina Pioneers

Images of Greenville County Wills 1787 to 1818
  • Arnold, Benjamin, LWT
  • Ayres, John
  • Barrett, Reubin (1812)
  • Benson, Elizabeth
  • Benson, Prue, LWT
  • Bots, Moon, LWT
  • Bradley, Abraham, LWT
  • Chastain, Abraham, estate (1845)
  • Chandler, Joel, LWT
  • Collins, John, LWT
  • Cooley, Jacob
  • Cox, John, LWT
  • Crain, Judith, LWT
  • Crayton, Thomas, LWT
  • Darrach, Hugh, LWT
  • Dill, John, LWT (1807)
  • Dill, Stephen, LWT (1839)
  • Duncan, Sally, LWT
  • Dunn, Benjamin
  • Dyer, Samuel, LWT
  • Edwards, John, LWT
  • Edwards, Sally
  • Fisher, Nicholas, LWT
  • Ford, Mary, LWT
  • Ford, John, LWT
  • Forest, Jeremiah, LWT
  • Forrester, James, LWT
  • Foster, John, LWT
  • Gaston, William
  • Goodlett, David, LWT
  • Goodlett, Hiram, LWT
  • Goodlett, Robert
  • Grace, Joel
  • Hackson, William
  • Hanes, Henry
  • Harrison, John, LWT
  • Hawkins, Eaton
  • Hawkins, Joshua, LWT
  • Hethcoth, Isaac
  • Howard, Edward, LWT
  • Howard, John, LWT
  • Hunt, William, LWT
  • Jackson, Elizabeth
  • Janes, Joseph, LWT
  • Jenkins, Micajah, LWT
  • Johnson, Hannah
  • Kelly, Samuel
  • Kemp, Richard, LWT
  • Kilgore, James
  • King, Edward
  • Kirby, Francis, LWT
  • Landrith, John
  • Langley, Carter, LWT
  • Langston, John, LWT
  • Lester, Archibald, LWT
  • Loveless, Isaac, LWT
  • Machen, Henry, LWT
  • Martin, George
  • Mathers, William, LWT
  • McClanahan, William, LWT (1802) transcript
  • McCleland, James
  • McCrary, James, LWT
  • McDaniel, John
  • McVicar, Adam, LWT
  • Moon, John, LWT (1839), transcript
  • Moon, William, LWT (1835), transcript
  • Morgan, Isaac, LWT
  • Nelson, Robert
  • Owens, William, LWT
  • Payne, Isaiah, LWT
  • Payne, Thomas, LWT
  • Peden, John, LWT
  • Peden, John Sr., LWT
  • Peden, William, LWT
  • Pickett, Micajah, LWT
  • Pike, Lewis, LWT, transcript, 1819
  • Praytor, Middleton
  • Reece, Travace
  • Roberts, Hardy, LWT
  • Roe, James, LWT
  • Rogers, John, LWT
  • Sammons, John
  • Seaborn, George
  • Ship, William
  • Simmons, John
  • Sims, Drury, LWT
  • Smith, Alexander, LWT
  • Smith, Abner, LWT
  • Smith, Reubin, LWT
  • Sparks, Jesse, LWT
  • Stone, Mary LWT
  • Stone, Jonathan
  • Tarrant, Benjamin, LWT (1808)
  • Tarrant, John, LWT
  • Taylor, John, LWT
  • Thomas, William
  • Thompson, John, LWT
  • Thompson, Josiah
  • Thackston, William, LWT
  • Thrasher, Thomas, LWT
  • Turner, William
  • Vinson, Ezekiel
  • Waddill, Charles
  • Waddill, Edmund, LWT, image (1850)
  • Walker, Sylvanus
  • Welch, William, LWT
  • Wells, Samuel, LWT
  • Wickliff, Isaac, LWT
  • Wolfe, George
  • Wynne, Matthew, LWT
  • Yeargin, Andrew
  • Yeargin, Orgin
  • Young, John, LWT
  • Young, William, LWT
Digital Images of Inventories and Appraisements 1825 to 1829
  • Avery, Charles
  • Benson, Robert
  • Bradford, Philemon
  • Brooks, George
  • Brown, William
  • Clark, William
  • Cole, Ira
  • Cook, Nancy
  • Cooley, Jacob
  • Cowan, Francis
  • Crayton, Samuel
  • Croft, Frederick
  • Farr, James
  • Foster, Robert
  • Goldsmith, John
  • Hall, Merry
  • Loveless, Isaac
  • McClemons, Hugh
  • McCreary, Andrew
  • McJunkin, Daniel
  • Montgomery, Alexander
  • Moon, Samuel
  • Morgan, Jesse
  • Moseley, James
  • Nabors, Samuel
  • Nelson, Elisha
  • Pegalot, William
  • Ponder, James
  • Pool, Irvin P.
  • Rae, James
  • Rea, William
  • Rector, Lewis
  • Sloan, Alexander
  • Smith, Jeremiah
  • Sowel, Deadamia
  • Stoke, Levi
  • Stokes, Thomas
  • Stone, Mary
  • Sullivan, Charles
  • Taylor, John
  • Terry, Burksdale
  • Thurston, David
  • Towns, Samuel
  • Waddill, Charles
  • Welch, William
  • Westfield, John Jr.
  • Westmoreland, John
  • Young, William

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Monday, October 9, 2017

Kershaw Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Kershaw County Probate Records

Wateree RiverCamdenKershaw County was originally part of Camden District, and was formed in 1791 from Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield and Richland Counties. It was named for Joseph Kershaw (1727-1791). The county seat is Camden. Camden was first settled in about 1732 by the English who'd settled first in Charleston. Camden was occupied by the Revolutionary War from June of 1780 to May of 1781. Battle of Camden, South Carolina during the Revolutionary War.

South Carolina Wills and Estate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Map of Plantations in Lower Kershaw County
Index to Kershaw County Will Book A (1770-1826)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book N1 (1776-1833)
Index to Kershaw County Unrecorded Wills (1789-1816)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book A1 (1781-1820)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book C
Index to Kershaw County Will Book D (1803)

Transcripts of Kershaw County Will Book AI (1781 to 1820)
Testators: James Archer, Ebenezer Bagwell, Humphrey Barnett, Samuel Boykin, William Clemmons, William Collins, Thomas Dixon, Charles Ghent, Joseph Kershaw, Daniel Kirkland, Derret Long, William Norris, Lemuel Perry, Sterling Pettaway, James Pickett, John Platt, John Williams, Drury Wyche and William Wyly.
Transcripts of Kershaw County Will Book D (1803): only 4 wills
Testators: Catharine Rhodes, Ann Roach, Anthony Seals and Dillard Spradley.
Transcripts of Kershaw County Unrecorded Deeds (1789-1816)
Testators: William Beckham, Nicholas Bishop, Elizabeth Bracey, George Brown, Jonathan Bunckley, N. Center, Lewis Collins, James Crawford, Henry Croft, Edward Davis, Richard Davis, Isaac Dubose, Mary Egleton, Barwell Evans, William Forgueson, Alexander Goodall, Benjamin Haile and William Luyten.

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Monday, October 2, 2017

Abbeville Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Abbeville County Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants

Abbeville

Abbeville County was part of Ninety-Six District where the old deed may be found. It became Abbeville County in 1785, with parts later divided into Greenwood (1897) and McCormick (1916) counties. The county and the county seat were both named for the French town, Abbeville. The county was settled primarily by Scotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers in the mid-eighteenth century. After the treaty with the Cherokee Indians signed in 1777 at Dewitt's Corner (now Due West) with a flux ofScotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers. Abbeville played a major role in the secession from the union of the southern states, and it is the site where the last Confederate council was held. 

Early settlers: Andrew Hamilton, James Jordan, Patrick Forbis, James Moore, William McCaleb, William Young, James Maxwell, Thomas Coker, Tucker Woodson, William Brown, John Lawrence, Ralph Wilson, William Love, Thomas Shockley, William Love, Barnard Putnam, James Shirley, William Anderson, Richard Sadler, Benjamin Alderidge, John Nash, Adam Crain Jones, William Love, Joseph Brown and others.    See Names in Abbeville Co. Wills and Estates

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Monday, September 25, 2017

Laurens Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Laurens County Probate Records

Laurens County SC Court HouseLaurens County Governor's MansionLaurens County Governor's MansionLaurens County SC octagon houseLaurens County was established in 1785 as part of the Ninety Six District. It was named for Revolutionary War leader Henry Laurens (1724-1792). Settlers were Scotch-Irish and English immigrants who came in the early eighteenth century. When Revolutionary War battles such as the battle of Musgroves Mill on August 18 of 1780 were fought in the county, it was discovered that many of its residents were loyalists.

Early Settlers: McCain, Drew, Kellett, Miller, Millwee, Hellans, Allison, Prather, McNight, Logan, Cunningham, Ferguson, Adair, Baugh, Lewis, Starnes, Musgrove, Fowler, Arnall, Armstrong, Walker, Akins, Fowler, Garner, Dunlap, Simmons, Bailey, Griffin, Montgomery, Mahaffy, Coker, McCrary, Green, East, Crage, Stevens, Johnson, Goodman, Pollock, Garrot, Holcomb, Day and Middleton.

Wills and Estates Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Abstracts of Last Wills and Testaments
  • Laurens County Will Book A (1787-1789), abstracts
  • Laurens County Will Book C (1797-1807), abstracts
  • Laurens County Will Book D (1799-1817), abstracts
  • Laurens County Will Book E (1819-1825), abstracts
  • Index to Laurens County Will Book A (1766-1802)
  • Index to Laurens County Will Book F (1826-1834)
Digital Images of Wills, Book E, 1836-1839
Names of Testators: Allen, Sally ; Anderson, David ; Beal, Even ; Bell, David ; Blakely, James ; Calhoun, John ; Cheek, Ellis ; Cole, Mary ; Cummings, John ; Dunlap, Matthew ; Goodwin, William ; Hamilton, Jane ; Jones, Edward ; Leek, Bryant ; Leeman, Hugh ; McClintock, Martha ; McCoy, John ; McMeese, Robert ; Middlesperger, Abraham ; Pool, James ; Poole, Seth ; Potts, William ; Reece, William ; Robeson, Bennet ; Simpson, Sarah; Swan, Rebecca ; Wait, John ; Watson, Elijah
Misc. Laurens County, South Carolina Wills and Estates (images and transcripts)
  • Bailey, James, LWT, 1825, transcript
  • Bennett Richard, LWT, 1820
  • Brazeale, Enoch, LWT, 1825, transcript
  • Brown, Roger, LWT, 1825, transcript
  • Burnside, Thomas, 1825, transcript
  • Burnside, William, 1825, transcript
  • Carter, Robert, LWT, 1825, transcript
  • Cason, John, Sr., LWT
  • Garey, Charles, LWT, 1805
  • Garrett, Ambrose, LWT, 1840
  • Garrett, Hannah, LWT, 1821
  • Garrett, Jesse, LWT, 1853
  • Garrett, John, LWT, 1806
  • Garrot, Edward, LWT, 1794
  • Glenn, Alexander, LWT, 1825, transcript
  • Gordon, Ann, LWT, 1825, transcript
  • Holcombe, Richard, LWT, 1804
  • Jones, Joseph, 1825, transcript
  • Knight, Ephraim, 1825, transcript
  • Man, Susannah, LWT, 1797, transcript
  • Mathews, John, 1825, transcript
  • McCurley, John, 1825, transcript
  • McDaniel, Archibald, 1825, transcript
  • McGrady, William, 1825, transcript
  • Meadors, Susannah, 1825, transcript
  • Mitchel, Judith, 1825, transcript
  • Nickle, Chortis, 1825, transcript
  • Osborne, Daniel, 1825, transcript
  • Owings, Robert, LWT, 1840
  • Pinson, Aaron, LWT, transcript, 1803
  • Teague, Elijah, 1825, transcript
  • Wilson, John, 1825, transcript
Maps
  • Map of Laurens County
Military
  • Veterans of Laurens District in 1818 and 1832

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Monday, September 18, 2017

Kershaw Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Kershaw County Probate Records

Wateree RiverCamdenKershaw County was originally part of Camden District, and was formed in 1791 from Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield and Richland Counties. It was named for Joseph Kershaw (1727-1791). The county seat is Camden. Camden was first settled in about 1732 by the English who'd settled first in Charleston. Camden was occupied by the Revolutionary War from June of 1780 to May of 1781. Battle of Camden, South Carolina during the Revolutionary War.

South Carolina Wills and Estate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Map of Plantations in Lower Kershaw County
Index to Kershaw County Will Book A (1770-1826)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book N1 (1776-1833)
Index to Kershaw County Unrecorded Wills (1789-1816)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book A1 (1781-1820)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book C
Index to Kershaw County Will Book D (1803)

Transcripts of Kershaw County Will Book AI (1781 to 1820)
Testators: James Archer, Ebenezer Bagwell, Humphrey Barnett, Samuel Boykin, William Clemmons, William Collins, Thomas Dixon, Charles Ghent, Joseph Kershaw, Daniel Kirkland, Derret Long, William Norris, Lemuel Perry, Sterling Pettaway, James Pickett, John Platt, John Williams, Drury Wyche and William Wyly.
Transcripts of Kershaw County Will Book D (1803): only 4 wills
Testators: Catharine Rhodes, Ann Roach, Anthony Seals and Dillard Spradley.
Transcripts of Kershaw County Unrecorded Deeds (1789-1816)
Testators: William Beckham, Nicholas Bishop, Elizabeth Bracey, George Brown, Jonathan Bunckley, N. Center, Lewis Collins, James Crawford, Henry Croft, Edward Davis, Richard Davis, Isaac Dubose, Mary Egleton, Barwell Evans, William Forgueson, Alexander Goodall, Benjamin Haile and William Luyten.

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Monday, September 11, 2017

Edgefield Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Edgefield County Wills, Estates, Deeds

1890 EdgefieldEdgefield, South Carolina ca 1890 The county was formed in 1785 as part of Ninety Six District; parts of Edgefield later went to form Aiken (1871), Saluda (1895), Greenwood (1897), and McCormick (1916) counties. The county seat is the town of Edgefield. The northern part of the Ninety Six was previously inhabited by Cherokee Indians. The southern part adjoined the Savannah River and was used as hunting grounds by the Creeks, Savannahs and other tribes. Edgefield country was trafficked by white men who created a lucrative trade with the Indians for their buffalo and beaver skins and who exported as many as two hundred and fifty thousand skins a year from the state. It was not until 1748 that permanent settlements were made along the Savannah River. Families trickled in from England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Germany, Holland and France as well as from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. Others, forbidden to deal in slavery, fled from Georgia to make their plantations along the Savannah River. The first Scotch families settled on the Saluda side of Edgefield south of Chappells Ferry. The site was located near a hill where large chestnut trees grew. Later, the Baptist Church of Chestnut Hill was later organized and built. They called the settlement Scotland. Among the first Scots was Joseph Culbreath, born near Plymouth Scotland in 1747, who was brought to Edgefield by his father, Edward Culbreath in 1756. The father died a year later, leaving his sons, Joseph, John, Daniel and Edward. The sons all lived to be over the ages of 70. The family of Harry Hazel came with the Culbreaths to the new country. In 1770 a ferry was established over the Saluda River on the land of Robert Cunningham and another one over the Savannah River, opposite to Augusta in Georgia. Edgefield was the site of several Revolutionary War skirmishes and was defended by those who had settled from North Carolina and Virginia. One such family was that of William Abney who had settled about a mile or so from Scotland in 1772. Nathaniel Abney served as a captain of a militia company under Major Andrew Williamson at Ninety Six. Opposing the patriots was the Stewart family whose homestead was located on Tosty Creek on the Saluda.

Early settlers: Peter Finson, Francis W. Pickens, Benjamin Tilman, General Martin Witherspoon Cary, Allen Bailey, Nathan Melton, William Daniel, William Tobler, Spencer Hawes, George Miller, Jeremiah Lamar, Robert Gardner, David Pitts, Arthur Watson, Nathaniel Abney, Jesse Griffin, George Bender, Michael Burkhalter, Thomas Spraggins, Mathew Devore, Allen Burton, George Kyser, Nathaniel Bacon, Wright Nicholson, Joseph McGinnis, John Oliphant, John Blalock, Benjamin Buzbie, Robert Jennings, Jessy Rountree, Amos Richardson, Hezekiah Gentry, Benjamin Hightower, Thomas turk, Stephen Garrett and others.

Edgefield county Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers
  • Edgefield County Wills, Bks A, B and C, 1775-1835 (abstracts)
  • Index to Edgefield County Will Book D, 1836-1853
  • 1817 Map of Edgefield County
Miscellaneous Edgefield County Wills, Deeds, etc. (Images and Transcripts)
  • Adams, John (LWT) 1823
  • Adams, John Deed to William McDaniel (1816)
  • Adams, John Deed to Joel McLemore (1819)
  • Adams, John Deed to Henry Anderson
  • Adams, John Deed to John Hinson(1824)
  • Ballentine, Hugh, 1809 Promise
  • Bolger, Elizabeth
  • Bush, Isaac
  • Cary, William
  • Ferguson, William
  • Garrett, Edward
  • Hagens, William
  • Hamilton, William
  • Hammond, Charles Sr.
  • Mims, Beheatherland
  • Mock, George Sr., LWT (1790)
  • Morgan, Evan
  • Neyle, Daniel, 1750 Land Grant
  • Ramage, James
  • Richardson, Jefferson
  • Savage, John Land Grant, originally the Land Grant of Benjamin Harris
  • Self, Daniel
  • Strum, Henry Bond to Jeremiah Burnet of Liberty County, Georgia
  • Sullivan, Pressly
  • Swearington, Van
  • Tate, Henry
  • Williams, Roger
  • Youngblood, Mary

Edgefield Co. SC Genealogies and Histories

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Monday, September 4, 2017

Abbeville Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Abbeville County Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants

Abbeville

Abbeville County was part of Ninety-Six District where the old deed may be found. It became Abbeville County in 1785, with parts later divided into Greenwood (1897) and McCormick (1916) counties. The county and the county seat were both named for the French town, Abbeville. The county was settled primarily by Scotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers in the mid-eighteenth century. After the treaty with the Cherokee Indians signed in 1777 at Dewitt's Corner (now Due West) with a flux ofScotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers. Abbeville played a major role in the secession from the union of the southern states, and it is the site where the last Confederate council was held. 

Early settlers: Andrew Hamilton, James Jordan, Patrick Forbis, James Moore, William McCaleb, William Young, James Maxwell, Thomas Coker, Tucker Woodson, William Brown, John Lawrence, Ralph Wilson, William Love, Thomas Shockley, William Love, Barnard Putnam, James Shirley, William Anderson, Richard Sadler, Benjamin Alderidge, John Nash, Adam Crain Jones, William Love, Joseph Brown and others.    See Names in Abbeville Co. Wills and Estates

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Thursday, August 31, 2017

Abbeville Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Abbeville County Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants

Abbeville

Abbeville County was part of Ninety-Six District where the old deed may be found. It became Abbeville County in 1785, with parts later divided into Greenwood (1897) and McCormick (1916) counties. The county and the county seat were both named for the French town, Abbeville. The county was settled primarily by Scotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers in the mid-eighteenth century. After the treaty with the Cherokee Indians signed in 1777 at Dewitt's Corner (now Due West) with a flux ofScotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers. Abbeville played a major role in the secession from the union of the southern states, and it is the site where the last Confederate council was held. 

Early settlers: Andrew Hamilton, James Jordan, Patrick Forbis, James Moore, William McCaleb, William Young, James Maxwell, Thomas Coker, Tucker Woodson, William Brown, John Lawrence, Ralph Wilson, William Love, Thomas Shockley, William Love, Barnard Putnam, James Shirley, William Anderson, Richard Sadler, Benjamin Alderidge, John Nash, Adam Crain Jones, William Love, Joseph Brown and others.    See Names in Abbeville Co. Wills and Estates

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