Tuesday, June 27, 2017

All was Lost but the Ship "Carolina" #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy

The Ship "Carolina" Survives Hurricanes and Reaches Charleston in 1669

Map of Ashley and Cooper RiversIn 1669 the Lords Proprietaries sent out from England three ships, the Carolina, the Port Royal, and the Albemarle, with about a hundred colonists aboard. They sailed the old sea road which took them first to Barbados. At was at Barbados that the Albemarle was caught in a storm, and wrecked. But there was more trouble ahead. As the other two ships, with a Barbados sloop, sailed on anal approached the Bahamas, the Port Royal was destroyed by another hurricane. The Carolina, however, pushed on with the sloop, reached Bermuda, and rested there. Then, with a small ship purchased in these islands, she turned west by south and came in March of 1670 to the good harbor of Port Royal, South Carolina. Southward, the Spaniards held old Florida where the town of St. Augustine had flourished since the 16th century. From this vantage, the Spanish could easily descend upon the English newcomers. The colonists debated the situation and decided to set some further space between them and lands of Spain. So the ships put out again to sea, beating northward a few leagues until it entered a harbor into which emptied two rivers, the Ashley and the Cooper. After going up the Ashley they were able to anchor and the colonists went ashore. On the west bank of the river, they began to build a town which for the King they named Charles Town. Ten years later this place was abandoned in favor of the more convenient point of land between the two rivers. Colonists came fast to this Carolina lying south. Barbados sent many; England, Scotland, and Ireland contributed a share; there came Huguenots from France, and a certain number of Germans. Ten years later the population numbered twelve hundred, and continued to increase. The early times were taken up with the wrestle with the forest, with the Indians, with Spanish alarms, with incompetent governors, with the Lords Proprietaries' Fundamental Constitutions, and with the restrictions which English Navigation Laws imposed upon English colonies. What grains and vegetables and tobacco they could grow, what cattle and swine they could breed and export, preoccupied the minds of these pioneer farmers. There were struggling for growth a rough agriculture and a hampered trade with Barbados, Virginia, and New England trade likewise with the buccaneers who swarmed in the West Indian waters. Free bootery was allowed to flourish in American seas. Gross governmental faults, Navigation Acts, and a hundred petty and great oppressions, general poverty, adventurousness, lawlessness, and sympathy of mishandled folk with lawlessness, all combined to keep Brother of the Coast, Buccaneer, and Filibuster alive, and their ships upon all seas. Many were no worse than smugglers; others were robbers with violence; and a few had a dash of the fiend. All nations had buccaneers on the seas and the early settlers on these shores never violently disapproved of the pirate. He was often a "good fellow" who delivered needed articles without dues, easy to trade with, and had Spanish gold in his pouch. Pirates frequently came ashore to Charles Town, and they traded with him there. For this reason, at one time Charles Town got the name of "Rogue's Harbor." However, as better emigrants arrived and planted tobacco and wheat along the Ashley and Cooper rivers, the tone changed. But it was not until the final years of the seventeenth century that a ship touching at Charleston left there a bag of Madagascar rice. Planted, it gave increase that was planted again. Suddenly it was found that this was the crop for low-lying Carolina. Rice became her staple, as was tobacco of Virginia. For the rice fields and system of large plantations, an aristocratic structure embraced Charles Town. To escape heat and sickness, the planters of rice and indigo gave over to employees the care of their great holdings and lived themselves in pleasant Charleston. These plantations, with their great gangs of slaves under overseers, also had the indentured white laborers whose passage was paid for by English, who were promised fair freedom after a certain number of years. While the caste system was predominantly strong in England, the charters for the colonies provided an overplus power to grant liberty of conscience, although at home was a hot persecuting time. Thus, Huguenots, Independents, Quakers, dissenters of many kinds, found on the whole refuge and harbor in the colonies. Moreso than any of the other colonies, South Carolina had great plantations, a bustling town society, suave and polished, a learned clergy, an aristocratic cast to life. A place where the sea-line offered access to stretches of rivers to all vessels. 

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Friday, June 23, 2017

Newberry Co. SC Genealogy Records: Deeds, Wills, Estates #southcarolinapioneersnet

Newberry County Probate Records

Bush River Quaker CemeteryIn 1783 an ordinance was passed to divide the districts of Charleston, Georgetown, Cheraw, Camden, Ninety-Six, Orangeburg and Beaufort into counties not more than forty miles square. When the County Court Act was written in 1785, a court was held (in every county) once every three months and the first court was held at the house of Colonel Robert Rutherford on September 5th. The Justices present were Robert Rutherford, Robert Gillam, George Ruff, Levi Casey, John Lindsey, Philemon Waters and Levi Manning. William Malone was appointed clerk serving until 1794 with his deputies, viz: Thomas Brooks Rutherford, Major Frederick Nance and William Satterwhite. It was not until 1787 that another location for holding court was designated, being on the north side of the Bush River. William Caldwell and Joseph Wright were appointed to run a line agreed upon by the Justices to fix the public buildings by, which survey was produced at the house of John Coate. The county seat is the town of Newberry. 

Newberry County Wills and Estates Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers 

Images of Abstracts of Deeds
  • Deed Book A, 1776 to 1791 (Index)
  • Deed Book B, 1792 to 1794 (Index)
  • Deed Book C, 1794 to 1797 (Index)
  • Deed Book D, 1797 to 1798 (Index)
  • Deed Book E, 1798 to 1800 (Index)
  • Deed Book F, 1800 to 1803 (Index)
  • Deed Book G, 1803 to 1804 (No Index)
  • Deed Book H, 1804 to 1805 (No Index)
Indexes to Probate Records
  • General Index to Wills 1776-1858
  • Will Bk L, some abstracts
  • Will Book A (1776 to 1814)
  • Wills and Estates 1776-1850
  • Wills and Inventories 1787-1796
  • Wills and Inventories 1800-1803
  • Wills and Inventories 1803-1810
  • Wills and Inventories 1809-1814
  • Wills and Inventories 1816-1818
  • Inventories and Sales, Book B
  • Will Book E (1805 to 1826)
  • Will Book F (1823 to 1860)
  • Will Book 4 (1840 to 1858)
Abstracts and Typed Transcripts, Wills, Inventories, Estates
  • Wills and Inventories 1776 to 1814
  • Wills and Inventories 1800 to 1814
  • Wills and Inventories 1809 to 1814
  • Book A, 1776=1796
  • Book B, 1796-1800
  • Book C, 1800-1803
  • Book D, 1803-1810
  • Book E, 1809-1814
  • Book F, 1815-1818
Miscellaneous
  • Marriage Contract between John Folks and Eve Margrete Dickert
  • Charles Littleton gives Release to Wadlington
Transcripts of Newberry County Wills (1774 to 1790) 

Testators: Ballentine infants, guardian appointed; Richard Bonds, James Chandler, Cornelius Cox, Jacob Crommer, Rebecca Crommer, George Dawkins, Daniel Dewalt, Peter Dewalt, Michael Dickert Sr., Enos Elliman, Laurens Feagle, James Ford, Peter Galloway, John Gary, William Gilliam, John Glen, Thomas Grasty, Thomas Green, Nathaniel Harris, James Hodges, Henry Kesler, Charles King, Stephen Lewis, John Lindsey, Robert Man, James Murphey, John Newman, William O;Neall, Jacob Oxner Sr., Isaac Parmer, Benjamin Pearson, Samuel Pearson, Jacob Setsler, John Suber, William Taylor, Elizabeth Turner, William Turner, John Vaun, John Adam Wicker, Mathias Wickert.

Transcripts of Newberry County Wills (1840 to 1848) 

Testators: Anderson, Richard, Anderson, William, Brown, I. R. S. , Buchanan, Lucy , Bundrick, Sarah, Burton, Aaron, Burton, John, Caldwell, John, Caldwell, John (2), Cary, Elizabeth, Chalmers, Thomas, Calmes, George, Cannon, Richard S., Chapman, Mary, Conwills, Sophia, Counts, John,Cromer, Christiana, Cromer, Hannah, Cromer, Michael, Crooks, John, Darlyrmple, Thomas , Davenport, Jonathan, Davidson, John, Davis, Thomas, Dennis, Prudence, Dominick, George, Dominick, Margaret, Downing, J. W., Duckett, Jacob, Enlow, Margaret , Eppes, George, Eppes, William, Erskin, Margaret, Feagle, Laurens, Floyd, Charles Jr., Frisock, Barbary, Gallman, Henry, Galloway, John, Garner, James, Gibal, A., Glenn, Naomi , Gordon, Eli , Gray, Peter , Griffin, Isaac, Harmon, David , Harmon, William, Hatton, David, Henry, James, Holloway, John, Hume, David , Keller, Jacob, Kelly, John, Kelly, Robert ,Kenner, James, Kenner, Samuel, Kinard, George,Kinard, John Michael , Kinard, Martin, Koon, John, Lake, Enoch, Lane, Nancy, Langford, Polly, Lindsey, Benjamin, Lindsey, James, Livingston, John, Long, John Thomas, Lyles, Robert , Lynch, Elijah , Maybin, John, McConnel, Andrew, McCrackin, Nancy, McKee, Joseph, McLemore, M. E., Miller, Nancy, Nance, Clement, Nance, Frederick Sr., Paysinger, John, Polk, John, Rauskett, Thomas, Rees, Jane, Renwick, Jane , Rikard, Michael, Riser, Martin, Robinson, James, Rudd, Mary An,Rutherford, William, Shumpert, Jacob, Sligh, Jacob, Smith, Martha, Spearman, John, Stabler, Moses, Stone, Phebe, Suber, Andrew, Summers, Rosannah, Thomas, John G., Thomas, Mary, Vaughn, Drury, Waldrop, Milly, Wearts, George Henry, Wertz, John ,Wheeler, Barbara , White, William, Whitmire, William ,Wicker, Simon, Willhelm, Peter, Worthington, Jacob ,Young, Harriet , Young, John T.

Abstracts of Newberry County Will Bk L 

Testators: Adams, Sarah; Buchanan, Micajah; Coppock, Joseph; Lagrone, John; Mangum, William Sr.; Taylor, Benjamin; Taylor, Elizabeth; Taylor, William; Wadlington, James; Waldrop, John 

Miscellaneous
  • Release of Charleston Littleton to Wadlington
  • Marriage Contract between Eve Margrete Dickert and John Folk

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Monday, June 19, 2017

Kershaw Co. SC Genealogies and Histories #southcarolinapioneersnet

Kershaw County Probate Records

Wateree RiverCamdenKershaw County was originally part of Camden District, and was formed in 1791 from Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield and Richland Counties. It was named for Joseph Kershaw (1727-1791). The county seat is Camden. Camden was first settled in about 1732 by the English who'd settled first in Charleston. Camden was occupied by the Revolutionary War from June of 1780 to May of 1781. Battle of Camden, South Carolina during the Revolutionary War.

South Carolina Wills and Estate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Map of Plantations in Lower Kershaw County
Index to Kershaw County Will Book A (1770-1826)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book N1 (1776-1833)
Index to Kershaw County Unrecorded Wills (1789-1816)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book A1 (1781-1820)
Index to Kershaw County Will Book C
Index to Kershaw County Will Book D (1803)

Transcripts of Kershaw County Will Book AI (1781 to 1820)
Testators: James Archer, Ebenezer Bagwell, Humphrey Barnett, Samuel Boykin, William Clemmons, William Collins, Thomas Dixon, Charles Ghent, Joseph Kershaw, Daniel Kirkland, Derret Long, William Norris, Lemuel Perry, Sterling Pettaway, James Pickett, John Platt, John Williams, Drury Wyche and William Wyly.
Transcripts of Kershaw County Will Book D (1803): only 4 wills
Testators: Catharine Rhodes, Ann Roach, Anthony Seals and Dillard Spradley.
Transcripts of Kershaw County Unrecorded Deeds (1789-1816)
Testators: William Beckham, Nicholas Bishop, Elizabeth Bracey, George Brown, Jonathan Bunckley, N. Center, Lewis Collins, James Crawford, Henry Croft, Edward Davis, Richard Davis, Isaac Dubose, Mary Egleton, Barwell Evans, William Forgueson, Alexander Goodall, Benjamin Haile and William Luyten.

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Friday, June 16, 2017

Kirkland Families of Fairfield and Kershaw Counties SC traced! #southcarolinapioneersnet

The following families have been traced and added to South Carolina Pioneers
  • Kirkland of Fairfield Co.
  • Kirkland of Kershaw Co.

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Thursday, June 15, 2017

Friday, June 9, 2017

British were Captured by a Sandbar #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy

The British Captured by Sandbars on Sullivan's Island

By Jeannette Holland Austin (Profile)
During 1775, Robert Jordan enlisted for six months as a private in the company of Captain Francis Marion, 2nd South Carolina Continental Regiment. He was at the battle of Sullivan's Island near Charleston when the British entered the harbor. Actually, the British anticipated an easy win. However, when three or four vessels miscalculated the depth of shallow water and were bogged down in the sand, events took on a different course. Hence, the attempt to send landing parties onto the island failed. Overwhelmed, the British found themselves solely defeated. Yet excitement encompassed the hearts of the patriots and was a good beginning for the Southern Campaign. However, eventually the British seized the port of Charleston and made life miserable for its residents by establishing martial law and imprisoning captured patriots and putting them on board a prison ship anchored on the Ashley River. After this win, Jordan went on to become Sgt. of the Horse (1781) and was later promoted to Quartermaster under General Marion when they attacked the British at Pee Dee Swamp. There are so many interesting accounts and thrilling stories contained in the pensions of soldiers that it behooves the genealogist to study all facets of it. South Carolina County Histories and Genealogy 

Battle of Sullivan's Island
Battle of Sullivan's Island. 

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The Dutch Fork Settlement #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy

The Dutch Fork Settlement

Dutch ForkThis part of the upcountry was settled by Germans, Scotch-Irish, English, and emigrants from the sister States of North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania. The German settlement was in the fork, between the Broad and Saluda Rivers to within three miles of the Newberry Court House. Soon thereafter the line was extended eight miles below Hugheys on the Broad River to the mouth of Bear Creek, on the Saluda River. Germans were so prevalent in part of Newberry County that it become known as Dutch Fork. Adam Summer, the father of Colonel John Adam Sumner, headed the settlement beginning in 1745. Colonel Sumner and Major Frederick Gray were known to be whigs. Among those settling were the religiously oppressed Palatines who were driven from the Rhine, Baden and Wurtemburg into England during 1710 where they were quartered in tents and booths near London. From there, they were sent to North Carolina and South Carolina. The first German settlers were: Summers, Mayer, Ruff, Eigleberger, Count, Sligh, Piester, Gray, DeWalt, Boozer, Busby, Buzzard, Shealy, Bedenbaugh, Cromer, Berley, Heller, Koon, Wingard, Suber, Folk, Dickert, Cappleman, Halfacres, Chapman, Black, Kinard, Bounight, Barr, Harmon, Bower, Kibler, Gallman, Lever, Hartman, Frick, Stoudemoyer, Dominick, Singley, Bulow, Paysinger, Wallern, Stayley, Ridlehoover, Librand, Leaphart, Hopes, Houseal, Bernhard, Shuler, Haltiwanger, Swigart, Meetze, Schumpert, Fulmore, Livingston, Schmitz, Eleazer, Drehr, Lorick, Wise, Crotwell, Youngener, Nunamaker, Souter, Epting and Huffman. The Quakers settled on the Bush River and the Beaverdam about three or four miles on each side of the river. Among them was William Coate who resided between Spring Field and the Bush River and Samuel elly, a native of King County, Ireland, who came to Newberry from Camden to settle at Spring Field. Others were: John Furnas, David Jenkins, Benjamin Pearson, William Pearson, Peter Hare, Robert Evans, John Wright, Joseph Wright, William Wright, James Brooks, Joseph Thomson, James Patty, Gabriel McCoole, John Coate, (Big) Isaac Hollingsworth, William O Neall, Walter Herbert, Sr., Daniel Parkins, Daniel Smith, Samuel Miles, David Miles, William Miles, Samuel Brown, Israel Gaunt, Azariah Pugh, William Mills, Jonathan and Caleb Gilbert, John Galbreath, James Coppock, John Coppock, Joseph Reagin, John Reagin, Abel and James Insco, Jesse Spray, Samuel Teague, George Pemberton, Jehu Inman, Mercer Babb, James Steddam, John Crumpton, Isaac Cook, John Jay , Reason Reagen, Thomas and Isaac Hasket, Thomas Pearson, Enoch Pearson, Samuel Pearson, Nehemiah Thomas, Abel Thomas, Timothy Thomas, Euclydus Longshore, Sarah Duncan, Samuel Duncan and John Duncan. 

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