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Friday, April 29, 2016

Images of Fairfield Co. SC Wills, Estates, Genealogy# #southcarolinapioneers.net


South Carolina Pioneers

Fairfield County Wills and Estates

Mayfair Plantation TrentonThe county was formed in 1785 as part of Ninety Six District and Camden County; parts of Edgefield later went to form Aiken (1871), Saluda (1895), Greenwood (1897), and McCormick. The town of Winnsboro, which was settled around 1755, is the county seat. It was settled both by Scotch-Irish immigrants from northern colonies, and by English and French Huguenot cotton planters from the low country. In the colonial period this area was a center for the Regulator movement, which sought to bring law and order to the backcountry. During the Revolutionary War, Lord Cornwallis made his headquarters in Winnsboro from October 1780 to January 1781.

Early Settlers: Mobley, Killpatrick, Maple, Walker, Hendrix, Austin, Woodward, Williams, Sights, Gibson, Andrews, Thompson, Brown, McKinstry, Alston, Marple, McCaulley, Durham, Davis, McMorris, Martin, Bell , Minor Winn, James Robertson, Benjamin Cleveland, and others.

Wills and Estate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Fairfield County Will Book A (abstracts)

Fairfield County Will Book 1: Transcripts (1787-1791)
Testators: Arledge, Moses; Beasley, Jacob; Belton, Sarah; Briggs, Frederick; Brown, Jacob; Carden, Larkin; Carledge, Isaac; Colfman, Charles; Dods, John; Fellows, Mathias; Graves, James; Hill, William; Hornsby, Leonard; Lewis, John; Lowe, Isaac; Marple, Thomas; McCreight, William; McMaster, Hugh; Miller, Alexander; Neal, Samuel; Owens, Thomas; Peay, George; Phillips, Robert; Robertson, Henry ; Rogers, John; Routledg, Thomas; Scott, George; Starns, Peter; Young, John
Fairfield County Will Book 2: Transcripts (1792-1795)
Testators: Aiken, Charles; Andrews, James; Andrews, John; Auston, Elizabeth; Bell, Thomas; Bennett, Sarah; Boney, Jacob; Brown, Robert; Burns, Dennis; Camron, Joseph; Cassity, Peter; Cockrel, Moses; Coleman, Robert; Colhoun, James; Colhoun, William; Collins, Moses; Cook, Esther; Cork, John; Dods, Joseph; Evans, David; Frazer, William; Funderburgh, Henry; Gamble, Hugh; Gamble, Samuel; Gibson, Jacob; Hardage, James; Hays, Mathew; Holles, Moses; Holmes, William; Hugeley, Henry; Johnson, James; Kirkland, Francis; Knighton, Moses; Lemley, Peter; Lewey, George; Littlejohn, Marcellas; Martin, George; McBride, Robert; McClurken, John; McColloch, John; McCreight, David; McDowell, Alexander; McFadden, Anne; McMullon, John; Mickle, Thomas; Neeley, Richard; Neely, Richard; Paul, James; Pettipool, Ephraim; Phillips, William; Porter, James; Robertson, Alexander; Robinson, Margaret ; Sanders, Nathan; Shaver, Philip; Waugh, Samuel; Whitted, William
Fairfield County Will Book 4: Transcripts (1800-1803)
Testators: Arskin, Peter; Austin, Elizabeth; Austin, James; Bell, George; Ewing, William; Henson, Bartlet; Husey, Isaac; Kincaid, James ; Lightner, John; Marple, Northrup; Miller, John; Mobley, Samuel; Morris, William; Paul, Arsbald; Richardson, Samuel; Robinson, James; Thompson, John; Walker, Henry; Woodward, Elizabeth; Woodward, Henry
Fairfield Will Book A (abstracts)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 1 (1787-1791)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 2 (1792-1795)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 4 (1800-1803)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 5 (1804-1805)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 6 (1806-1807)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 7 (1815-1816)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 8 (1822-1823)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 9 (1824-1829)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 10 (1828-1829)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 12 (1829-1830)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 11 (1836-1837)
Index to Fairfield County Will Book 13 (1831-1833)
Index to Fairfield County Probate Records, 1787 to 1868, Surnames A to Z

"Fortune", the Beloved Servant of Captain John Buchanan
By Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
Captain John Buchanan and his brother, Robert, came to this country from Ireland a few years before the Revolutionary war. The brother, Robert resided in Charleston and taught a classical school. Robert served as a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War and was captured at the fall of Charleston and died on board a British ship.

Captain John Buchanan raised a company in Fairfield and fought in the battle of Cowpens and other battles. He was stationed at Georgetown, and upon the landing of Marquis LaFayette, was the first American officer to welcome and entertain the gallant Frenchman who helped to achieve the liberties of America. The captain had the honor of presenting LaFayette with a fine horse. As it was, Captain Buchanan had a body servant named Fortune. His name is attached to a spring in a fine grove near Winnsboro, where Fortune cultivated a rice patch. When LaFayette visited this country in 1826, Fortune traveled to Lancaster to visit him. At first, the sentinel refused to admit the old African, but he persisted, and was admitted by order of General LaFayette who recognized him and was glad to see the servant of his old friend. Nearly fifty years had passed since Fortune had blacked his boots. This is not the only time Fortune appeared in public. It is also said that during the French Revolution, the Captain sometimes wore his full military uniform on public occasions, and mount his war steed to ride up and down the main street of Winnsboro, followed by Fortune.

Map of Fairfield County



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  • Abbeville Co. SC Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants #genealogy #southcarolinapioneers
    Abbeville County Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants Abbeville County was part of Ninety-Six District where the old deed may be found. It became Abbeville County in 1785, with parts later divided into Greenwood (1897) and McCormick (1916) counties. The county and the county seat were both named for the French town, Abbeville. The county was settled primarily by Scotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers in the mid-eighteenth century. After the treaty with the Cherokee Indians signed in 1777 at Dewitt's Corner (now Due West) with a flux ofScotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers. Abbeville played a major role in the secession…
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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
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Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

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Thursday, April 28, 2016

Edgefield Co. SC Wills, Estates #genealogy #southcarolinapioneers.net

South Carolina Pioneers

1890 Edgefield

Edgefield County Probate Records

Edgefield, South Carolina ca 1890 The county was formed in 1785 as part of Ninety Six District; parts of Edgefield later went to form Aiken (1871), Saluda (1895), Greenwood (1897), and McCormick (1916) counties. The county seat is the town of Edgefield. The northern part of the Ninety Six was previously inhabited by Cherokee Indians. The southern part adjoined the Savannah River and was used as hunting grounds by the Creeks, Savannahs and other tribes. Edgefield country was trafficked by white men who created a lucrative trade with the Indians for their buffalo and beaver skins and who exported as many as two hundred and fifty thousand skins a year from the state. It was not until 1748 that permanent settlements were made along the Savannah River. Families trickled in from England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Germany, Holland and France as well as from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. Others, forbidden to deal in slavery, fled from Georgia to make their plantations along the Savannah River. The first Scotch families settled on the Saluda side of Edgefield south of Chappells Ferry. The site was located near a hill where large chestnut trees grew. Later, the Baptist Church of Chestnut Hill was later organized and built. They called the settlement Scotland. Among the first Scots was Joseph Culbreath, born near Plymouth Scotland in 1747, who was brought to Edgefield by his father, Edward Culbreath in 1756. The father died a year later, leaving his sons, Joseph, John, Daniel and Edward. The sons all lived to be over the ages of 70. The family of Harry Hazel came with the Culbreaths to the new country. In 1770 a ferry was established over the Saluda River on the land of Robert Cunningham and another one over the Savannah River, opposite to Augusta in Georgia. Edgefield was the site of several Revolutionary War skirmishes and was defended by those who had settled from North Carolina and Virginia. One such family was that of William Abney who had settled about a mile or so from Scotland in 1772. Nathaniel Abney served as a captain of a militia company under Major Andrew Williamson at Ninety Six. Opposing the patriots was the Stewart family whose homestead was located on Tosty Creek on the Saluda.

Early settlers: Peter Finson, Francis W. Pickens, Benjamin Tilman, General Martin Witherspoon Cary, Allen Bailey, Nathan Melton, William Daniel, William Tobler, Spencer Hawes, George Miller, Jeremiah Lamar, Robert Gardner, David Pitts, Arthur Watson, Nathaniel Abney, Jesse Griffin, George Bender, Michael Burkhalter, Thomas Spraggins, Mathew Devore, Allen Burton, George Kyser, Nathaniel Bacon, Wright Nicholson, Joseph McGinnis, John Oliphant, John Blalock, Benjamin Buzbie, Robert Jennings, Jessy Rountree, Amos Richardson, Hezekiah Gentry, Benjamin Hightower, Thomas turk, Stephen Garrett and others.

Edgefield county Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers
  • Edgefield County Wills, Bks A, B and C, 1775-1835 (abstracts)
  • Index to Edgefield County Will Book D, 1836-1853
  • 1817 Map of Edgefield County
Miscellaneous Edgefield County Wills, Deeds, etc. (Images and Transcripts)
  • Adams, John (LWT) 1823
  • Adams, John Deed to William McDaniel (1816)
  • Adams, John Deed to Joel McLemore (1819)
  • Adams, John Deed to Henry Anderson
  • Adams, John Deed to John Hinson(1824)
  • Ballentine, Hugh, 1809 Promise
  • Bolger, Elizabeth
  • Bush, Isaac
  • Cary, William
  • Ferguson, William
  • Garrett, Edward
  • Hagens, William
  • Hamilton, William
  • Hammond, Charles Sr.
  • Mims, Beheatherland
  • Mock, George Sr., LWT (1790)
  • Morgan, Evan
  • Neyle, Daniel, 1750 Land Grant
  • Ramage, James
  • Richardson, Jefferson
  • Savage, John Land Grant, originally the Land Grant of Benjamin Harris
  • Self, Daniel
  • Strum, Henry Bond to Jeremiah Burnet of Liberty County, Georgia
  • Sullivan, Pressly
  • Swearington, Van
  • Tate, Henry
  • Williams, Roger
  • Youngblood, Mary
Willington Academy
By Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
During 1801 a famous school for boys was built along the banks of the Savannah River, on the Carolina side, about forty-five miles from Augusta and six miles from Willington. This was a time when the Broad River joined the Savannah on the Georgia side and a wagon trail led off into South Carolina. Willington Academy It was called the Willington School, named by his founder, Dr. Moses Waddel. Dr. Waddel was a Presbyterian minister who later became the president of the University of Georgia. This was a time when the basic studies were taught in the field schools.

Duel at Fort Charlotte
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Site of Fort Charlotte William H. Crawford was kin to the Crawfords of from Virginia of Scottish descent who settled in the backcountry in 1643, then came down into South Carolina and Georgia. They followed the back trail and crossed the Savannah River into Georgia. William had his early education in the Old Field Schools, and later taught in one of those schools not far from Augusta. Ultimately he arose to the office of Senator, then Secretary of War and Secretary of the Treasury. He was also the chosen candidate to run for president of the United States, however, suffered a paralyzing stroke of apoplexy. Thus, John Quincey Adams won the election in 1824. Crawford had political differences over a land scheme with Peter Lawrence Van Allen with whom he fought a duel. Von Allen was shot dead. Later on, there was a case in the Supreme Court of Worchester vs. Georgia concerning the land scheme The affair took place at the famous dueling ground along the Savannah River, which was the site of old Fort Charlotte, about twelve miles below Petersburg on the Carolina side. The fort (now in McCormick County) was built of granite stones quarried from across the Savannah River. The northern portion of the fort was in Oconee County across the river from Stephens County, Georgia.

The Fort became a popular spot for gentlemen to settle their differences. Several texts have referred to Fort Charlotte and there is evidence that about ten duels occurred there after the Revolutionary War. The map depicts the site as well as the old Cherokee Indian trails.

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  • Abbeville Co. SC Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants #genealogy #southcarolinapioneers
    Abbeville County Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants Abbeville County was part of Ninety-Six District where the old deed may be found. It became Abbeville County in 1785, with parts later divided into Greenwood (1897) and McCormick (1916) counties. The county and the county seat were both named for the French town, Abbeville. The county was settled primarily by Scotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers in the mid-eighteenth century. After the treaty with the Cherokee Indians signed in 1777 at Dewitt's Corner (now Due West) with a flux ofScotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers. Abbeville played a major role in the secession…
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Need to know if your ancestors left a will or estate record?  An easy, quick (and free) way to find out is to click on the links below.
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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee



Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

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REOCCURRING SUBSCRIPTION WITH PAYPAL = $150 per year. Guaranteed low rate so long as your subscription continues to renew itself. You may unsubscribe at any time, however, to prevent the reoccurring charge, you must "cancel" before the renewal date. To do this, login to your PayPal account and select the cancel option.


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Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Darlington Co. SC Wills, Estates #genealogy #southcarolinaioneers.net

South Carolina Pioneers

Darlington County Probate Records

Hartsville, South Carolina Summerford FarmsA home in Hartsville and Summerford Farms in Darlington, County. Darlington County was formed in 1785. The county seat is situated in Darlington. It was originally part of the Cheraw District, and later (1888) part of it was given for Florence County and again in (1902) to Lee County. Traditionally, Welsh, Scotch-Irish, and Englishmen farmed this land and ultimately planted cotton. Some early settlers were : David Rogerson Williams (1776-1830), Governor and scientific experimenter, James Lide Coker (1837-1918), Moses Scott, Absalom Gallaway and David R. Coker (1870-1938).

Probate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 1 (1785-1797)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 2 (1798-1812)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 3 (1813)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 4 (1814-1840)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 10 (1838-1853)
Darlington County Will Book 1 (1785-1797); Digital Images of Transcripts
  • Gallaway, Absalom
  • James, William
  • Scott, Moses
  • Webb, Jolly
Darlington County Will Book 2 (1798-1812); Digital Images of Transcripts
  • Beasley, John
  • Berry, William
  • Cannon, George
  • Cole, James
  • Connell, William
  • Cuttino, Elizabeth
  • DeWitt, Charles
  • Fountain, William
  • Ganey, Isaac
  • Gee, William
  • Hafe, John
  • Hafe, John (2)
  • Ham, Henry
  • Harrell, John
  • Harts, James
  • Hatchel, Morris
  • Hixon, Thomas
  • Kimbrough, Hannah
  • Mackintosh, John
  • McBride, Archibald
  • McBride, Sally
  • McCall, John
  • Mercer, Jesse
  • Mikell, Anne
  • Mixon, Mica
  • Muldrow, William
  • Nettles, Zachariah
  • Newberry, Jesse
  • Orr, John
  • Pawley, James
  • Pugh, Evan
  • Trivitt, Elliott
  • Revell, Matthew
  • Russell, James Jr.
  • Russell, Michael
  • Russell, Michael (2)
  • Sanders, Nathaniel
  • Smith, John
  • Stanley, Thomas
  • Teele, Christopher
  • Thomas, Solomon
  • Thornhill, John
  • Wilds, Mary, Mrs.
  • Wingate, Edward
  • Wood, Joseph
  • Wright, Benjamin
Darlington County Wills, Book 3 (1813); digital images of transcripts
  • Brown, Jesse
  • Parnal, James


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The Role that Welsh Neck Baptist Church Played in South Carolina
By Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
In 1737, a colony of Welsh from the Welsh Tract in Germantown, Pennsylvania (now Delaware) settled along the east bank of the Pee Dee River. A year later this colony of people met and organized themselves into a Baptist church, known as the Welsh Neck Baptist Church. It is said that the original church was built at Long Bluff (near Society Hill) on the bank of the Pee Dee River to the right of a public road leading from Bennettsville to Society Hill.

A fieldstone in the old Cashaway Baptist Church graveyard near the site of Cashaway Ferry, marks the resting place of Colonel Abel Kolb, a Revolutionary patriot and officer who was slain by Tories in 1781 while standing on the porch of his mansion. The British occupied most of the backcountry as well as the port of Charleston and this was the time when General Nathaniel Greene was preparing his attack on Ninety-Six. The Revolutionary War Pension of Colonel Kolb reflects that the Kolb family from Germany arrived in the country during 1707 and settled around Germantown in Pennsylvania. Four Kolb brothers, sons of Dielman Kolb and his wife, a Shumacher (shoe maker)of Manheim in Germany, were named Martin, Johannes, Jacob, and Henry. A fifth brother, Deilman, arrived in 1717. Johannes Kolb left Pennsylvania about 1737 and settled on the south bank of the Great Pee Dee River, called Kolb's Neck and located below present-day Society Hill. Johannes Kolb was the father of nine children, including Peter Kolb, the father of Abel Kolb. An early minister of the church was Reverend Philip James from Wales. The Surviving membership rolls reflect the first organizers, plus dates from 1759 to 1780s and reflect German and Scottish names. Two McIver families transferred their membership from Scotland on the rolls. The present-day cemetery appears to have started its burials about 1850 and also reveals a number of Scottish names. The surviving Membership Rolls listed under Churches on South Carolina Pioneers

Map of Darlington County

Coker House
Caleb Coker House build ca 1832

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  • Abbeville Co. SC Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants #genealogy #southcarolinapioneers
    Abbeville County Wills, Estates, Minutes, Land Grants Abbeville County was part of Ninety-Six District where the old deed may be found. It became Abbeville County in 1785, with parts later divided into Greenwood (1897) and McCormick (1916) counties. The county and the county seat were both named for the French town, Abbeville. The county was settled primarily by Scotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers in the mid-eighteenth century. After the treaty with the Cherokee Indians signed in 1777 at Dewitt's Corner (now Due West) with a flux ofScotch-Irish and French Huguenot farmers. Abbeville played a major role in the secession…
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Need to know if your ancestors left a will or estate record?  An easy, quick (and free) way to find out is to click on the links below.
arrow

County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee



Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

Membership to 8 Genealogy Websites - Reoccurring subscription with guaranteed low rate

REOCCURRING SUBSCRIPTION WITH PAYPAL = $150 per year. Guaranteed low rate so long as your subscription continues to renew itself. You may unsubscribe at any time, however, to prevent the reoccurring charge, you must "cancel" before the renewal date. To do this, login to your PayPal account and select the cancel option.


About your password. Please allow up to 2 hours for your password. If not received in a timely manner, click to send reminder

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