Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Her Skin was like Parchment .... A voice from the Past ..... #history #genealogy #southcarolinapioneersnet

Her skin was like parchment and very wrinkled 

Eva Young"My father, your great-grandfather, was a direct descendant on his mother's side of Landgrave Smith, first Colonial Governor of 11 South Carolina, his mother being Landgrave Smith's granddaughter; his grandfather was Pierre Robert, a Huguenot minister who emigrated to America, after the revocation of the edict of Nantes, and led the Huguenot colony to South Carolina. My father was born in 1791 in the old homestead situated forty miles up the river from Savannah. He had twelve children, and I was one of the younger members of his large family. His early life was similar to the life of any present-day boy, with school days and holidays. During the holidays he enjoyed the excellent hunting and fishing which our large plantation afforded and which gave him great skill in those sports; later in life he brought up his own sons to enjoy them with him. He used to tell us, to our great entertainment, many incidents of his childhood days. When a little boy he 12 used to drive through the country with his grandmother in a coach and four. 

After he left South Carolina College he made a trip through the North on horseback, as this was before the time of railroads. It took him a month to reach Pennsylvania and New York State, and as it was in the year of 1812, he happened to ride out of Baltimore as the British rode in. One episode always greatly shocked us, which was that of his seeing men in the public bakeries in Pennsylvania mixing bread dough with their bare feet. After father returned home he married a cousin, Miss Robert. He had one son by this marriage, at whose birth the young mother died. This son returning from a Northern 13 college on the first steamboat ever run between Charleston and New York, was drowned; for the vessel foundered and was lost off the coast of North Carolina. Father's second wife was a descendant of the Mays of Virginia, who were descendants of the Earl of Stafford's younger brother. This lady was my own dear mother and your great-grandmother. I must now tell you something about her grandmother, for my mother inherited much of her wonderful character from this stalwart Revolutionary character. My great-grandmother's eldest son, at nineteen, was a captain in the Revolutionary War, and she was left alone, a widow on her plantation. When the British made a raid on her home, carrying off everything, she remained undaunted, and, mounting a horse, rode in hot haste to where the army was stationed, and asked to see the 14 general in command. Her persistence gained admittance. She stated her case and the condition in which the British soldiers had left her home, and pleaded her cause with so much eloquence that the general ordered the spoils returned to her. This old lady, who was your great-great-great-grandmother, lived to be a hundred and six years old; her skin was like parchment and very wrinkled; she died at last from an accident. I have heard my mother say that she was a remarkable character, never idle, and her mind perfectly clear until the day of her death. At her advanced age she knitted socks for my eldest brother, a baby then, thus always finding something useful to employ her mind and her hands. 

Once there was a great scarcity of corn caused by a drought. Grandfather came to the rescue of the neighborhood. He sent a raft down to Savannah, which was the nearest town, and had brought back, at his expense, two thousand bushels of corn. He then sent out word to the poor of the surrounding country to come to him for what corn they needed, making each applicant give him a note for what he received. When he 16 had thus provided for the immediate wants of the people, he generously tore up the notes; for he had only taken them to prevent fraud." Source: Old Plantation Days. Being Recollections of Southern Life Before the Civil War by Mrs. N. B. De Saussur. 

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Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Factoring Agents

Factoring Agents in the Olden Days
By Jeannette Holland Austin

A factor is an agent who transacts business for another. In colonial days there were tobacco and cotton factors. In other words, shipping tobacco to England, the West Indies or elsewhere, required an agent to sell the crops and handle the business transactions. In 1672, one of the factors of George Lee, an English merchant, died in Virginia. At the time he was indebted to his principal for 700 pounds sterling. His property was passed into the hands of his mother who appointed an attorney to take charge of it. The whole estate was converted into tobacco, a crop which he was about to ship to his own consignee in England. The General Court interposed with an order requiring him to transfer the entire quantity to a third person in the mother country until the justice of the claim of Lee onn the property of his deceased agent had been decided. Also, all of his account books went back to England. As was the common practice, widows had plenty of suitors owing to a shortage of females in the Virginia colony. This is how the goods of an estate went into the hands of the second husband who very often showed no scruple in dealing with them as his personal property. Such was the case of Thomas Kingston, the agent of Thomas Cowell who owned a plantation in the colony about 1636. Upon the death of Kingston, his relict became the wife of Thomas Loving who appropriated the credits and merchandise of Cowell. Cowell petitioned that Loving be required to take an inventory of the property in his possession and to give bond in a large sum to hold it without further purloining it.
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Monday, January 2, 2017

Settlers to Newberry Co. SC #genealogy #history #southcarolinapioneersnet

Settlers to Newberry County

Old Quaker Burial GroundIn 1783 an ordinance was passed to divide the districts of Charleston, Georgetown, Cheraw, Camden, Ninety-Six, Orangeburg and Beaufort into counties not more than forty miles square. When the County Court Act was written in 1785, a court was held (in every county) once every three months and the first court was held at the house of Colonel Robert Rutherford on September 5th.. The Justices present were Robert Rutherford, Robert Gillam, George Ruff, Levi Casey, John Lindsey, Philemon Waters and Levi Manning. William Malone was appointed clerk serving until 1794 with his deputies, viz: Thomas Brooks Rutherford, Major Frederick Nance and William Satterwhite. It was not until 1787 that another location for holding court was designated, being on the north side of the Bush River. William Caldwell and Joseph Wright were appointed to run a line agreed upon by the Justices to fix the public buildings by, which survey was produced at the house of John Coate. The county seat is the town of Newberry. This part of the upcountry was settled by Germans, Scotch-Irish, English, and emigrants from the sister States of North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania. The German settlement was in the fork, between the Broad and Saluda Rivers to within three miles of the Newberry Court House. Soon thereafter the line was extended eight miles below Hugheys on the Broad River to the mouth of Bear Creek, on the Saluda River. Germans were so prevalent in part of Newberry County that it become known as Dutch Fork. Adam Summer, the father of Colonel John Adam Sumner, headed the settlement beginning in 1745. Colonel Sumner and Major Frederick Gray were known to be whigs. Among those settling were the religiously oppressed Palatines who were driven from the Rhine, Baden and Wurtemburg into England during 1710 where they were quartered in tents and booths near London. From there, they were sent to North Carolina and South Carolina. The first German settlers were: Summers, Mayer, Ruff, Eigleberger, Count, Sligh, Piester, Gray, DeWalt, Boozer, Busby, Buzzard, Shealy, Bedenbaugh, Cromer, Berley, Heller, Koon, Wingard, Suber, Folk, Dickert, Cappleman, Halfacres, Chapman, Black, Kinard, Bounight, Barr, Harmon, Bower, Kibler, Gallman, Lever, Hartman, Frick, Stoudemoyer, Dominick, Singley, Bulow, Paysinger, Wallern, Stayley, Ridlehoover, Librand, Leaphart, Hopes, Houseal, Bernhard, Shuler, Haltiwanger, Swigart, Meetze, Schumpert, Fulmore, Livingston, Schmitz, Eleazer, Drehr, Lorick, Wise, Crotwell, Youngener, Nunamaker, Souter, Epting and Huffman. The Quakers settled on the Bush River and the Beaverdam about three or four miles on each side of the river. Among them was William Coate who resided between Spring Field and the Bush River and Samuel elly, a native of King County, Ireland, who came to Newberry from Camden to settle at Spring Field. Others were: John Furnas, David Jenkins, Benjamin Pearson, William Pearson, Peter Hare, Robert Evans, John Wright, Joseph Wright, William Wright, James Brooks, Joseph Thomson, James Patty, Gabriel McCoole, John Coate, (Big) Isaac Hollingsworth, William O Neall, Walter Herbert, Sr., Daniel Parkins, Daniel Smith, Samuel Miles, David Miles, William Miles, Samuel Brown, Israel Gaunt, Azariah Pugh, William Mills, Jonathan and Caleb Gilbert, John Galbreath, James Coppock, John Coppock, Joseph Reagin, John Reagin, Abel and James Insco, Jesse Spray, Samuel Teague, George Pemberton, Jehu Inman, Mercer Babb, James Steddam, John Crumpton, Isaac Cook, John Jay , Reason Reagen, Thomas and Isaac Hasket, Thomas Pearson, Enoch Pearson, Samuel Pearson, Nehemiah Thomas, Abel Thomas, Timothy Thomas, Euclydus Longshore, Sarah Duncan, Samuel Duncan and John Duncan. Become a member of South Carolina Pioneers and view wills and estates

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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

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Sunday, January 1, 2017

Images of Edgefield Co. SC Wills, Estates, Deeds #genealogy #southcarolinapioneers.net

Edgefield County Wills, Estates, Deeds

1890 EdgefieldEdgefield, South Carolina ca 1890 The county was formed in 1785 as part of Ninety Six District; parts of Edgefield later went to form Aiken (1871), Saluda (1895), Greenwood (1897), and McCormick (1916) counties. The county seat is the town of Edgefield. The northern part of the Ninety Six was previously inhabited by Cherokee Indians. The southern part adjoined the Savannah River and was used as hunting grounds by the Creeks, Savannahs and other tribes. Edgefield country was trafficked by white men who created a lucrative trade with the Indians for their buffalo and beaver skins and who exported as many as two hundred and fifty thousand skins a year from the state. It was not until 1748 that permanent settlements were made along the Savannah River. Families trickled in from England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Germany, Holland and France as well as from Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina. Others, forbidden to deal in slavery, fled from Georgia to make their plantations along the Savannah River. The first Scotch families settled on the Saluda side of Edgefield south of Chappells Ferry. The site was located near a hill where large chestnut trees grew. Later, the Baptist Church of Chestnut Hill was later organized and built. They called the settlement Scotland. Among the first Scots was Joseph Culbreath, born near Plymouth Scotland in 1747, who was brought to Edgefield by his father, Edward Culbreath in 1756. The father died a year later, leaving his sons, Joseph, John, Daniel and Edward. The sons all lived to be over the ages of 70. The family of Harry Hazel came with the Culbreaths to the new country. In 1770 a ferry was established over the Saluda River on the land of Robert Cunningham and another one over the Savannah River, opposite to Augusta in Georgia. Edgefield was the site of several Revolutionary War skirmishes and was defended by those who had settled from North Carolina and Virginia. One such family was that of William Abney who had settled about a mile or so from Scotland in 1772. Nathaniel Abney served as a captain of a militia company under Major Andrew Williamson at Ninety Six. Opposing the patriots was the Stewart family whose homestead was located on Tosty Creek on the Saluda.

Early settlers: Peter Finson, Francis W. Pickens, Benjamin Tilman, General Martin Witherspoon Cary, Allen Bailey, Nathan Melton, William Daniel, William Tobler, Spencer Hawes, George Miller, Jeremiah Lamar, Robert Gardner, David Pitts, Arthur Watson, Nathaniel Abney, Jesse Griffin, George Bender, Michael Burkhalter, Thomas Spraggins, Mathew Devore, Allen Burton, George Kyser, Nathaniel Bacon, Wright Nicholson, Joseph McGinnis, John Oliphant, John Blalock, Benjamin Buzbie, Robert Jennings, Jessy Rountree, Amos Richardson, Hezekiah Gentry, Benjamin Hightower, Thomas turk, Stephen Garrett and others.

Edgefield county Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers
  • Edgefield County Wills, Bks A, B and C, 1775-1835 (abstracts)
  • Index to Edgefield County Will Book D, 1836-1853
  • 1817 Map of Edgefield County
Miscellaneous Edgefield County Wills, Deeds, etc. (Images and Transcripts)
  • Adams, John (LWT) 1823
  • Adams, John Deed to William McDaniel (1816)
  • Adams, John Deed to Joel McLemore (1819)
  • Adams, John Deed to Henry Anderson
  • Adams, John Deed to John Hinson(1824)
  • Ballentine, Hugh, 1809 Promise
  • Bolger, Elizabeth
  • Bush, Isaac
  • Cary, William
  • Ferguson, William
  • Garrett, Edward
  • Hagens, William
  • Hamilton, William
  • Hammond, Charles Sr.
  • Mims, Beheatherland
  • Mock, George Sr., LWT (1790)
  • Morgan, Evan
  • Neyle, Daniel, 1750 Land Grant
  • Ramage, James
  • Richardson, Jefferson
  • Savage, John Land Grant, originally the Land Grant of Benjamin Harris
  • Self, Daniel
  • Strum, Henry Bond to Jeremiah Burnet of Liberty County, Georgia
  • Sullivan, Pressly
  • Swearington, Van
  • Tate, Henry
  • Williams, Roger
  • Youngblood, Mary

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Thursday, December 29, 2016

Lavender at Valley Force #genealogy #history #southcarolinapioneers.net

Valley Forge

Valley ForgeCharles Lavender was a resident of Amherst County, Virginia when he enlisted in the American Revolutionary War. He fought under General George Washington and was at Valley Forge in 1777. He was man six foot three inches tall who had 22 children by two wives. However, at the time of his death in Edgefield District at the age of 99 years, only three of his children were living.

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Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Willington Academy for Boys #history #genealogy #southcarolinapioneers.net

Willington Academy
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Willington AcademyDuring 1801 a famous school for boys was built along the banks of the Savannah River, on the Carolina side, about forty-five miles from Augusta and six miles from Willington. This was a time when the Broad River joined the Savannah on the Georgia side and a wagon trail led off into South Carolina. It was called the Willington School, named by his founder, Dr. Moses Waddel. Dr. Waddel was a Presbyterian minister who later became the president of the University of Georgia. This was a time when the basic studies were taught in the field schools. 

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Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Old Fort Prince George

Fort Prince George in South Carolina
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Fort Prince GeorgePictured is the excavation of Fort Prince George showing post molds outlining a structure within the fort. During 1966 the staff from the South Carolina Institute of Anthropology and Archaeology with the cooperation and support of Duke Power, commenced an archaeological salvage of the area purported to be the site of the old fort. This excavation continued until May of 1968 when it was covered by the rising water of Lake Keowee. As early as 1734, the importance of a fort had been recognized in Charlestown, however, its construction was postponed. The colonists, instead of building the fort themselves, petitioned the Parliament of Great Britain to build it. After years of delay the province was compelled to do the work at its own expense with the Council directing that land be purchased from the Indians and that the fort be erected as near as possible to the Indian town of Keowee. Finally, during the fall of 1753, Governor Glen visited the country of the Lower Cherokees and purchased the land from them upon which to build the fort. This purchase presumably included the districts of Abbeville, Edgefield, Laurens, Union, Spartanburg, Newberry, Chester, Fairfield, Richland and York. The fort was called Fort Prince George but only held the peace for a short while before massacres began again and the savages were as restless as before. The South Carolina governor again invited the Chiefs to meet him in conference in Charlestown, but they refused, lending the excuse that they feared contracting the fatal sickness of smallpox. They did, however, meet at Saluda Old Town, which was between the Nation and Charlestown. The purpose was to settle upon a stronger peace than earlier versions. #history #genealogy #southcarolinapioneers.net

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Monday, December 26, 2016

A SC Hero of the Alama #genealogy #history #southcarolinapioneersnet

South Carolina Hero of the Alamo

William Barrett Travis, hero of the Alamo, was born 9 Aug 1809, about four miles from Red Bank Church in Edgefield County. He was the son of Mark Travis, Sr. William studied law under the Honorable James Dellett. In 1835 he left his home in Southern Alabama and removed to Texas. Travis sympathized with the Texans against Santa Anna, the dictator of Mexico (of which Texas formed a part) who was endeaving to consolidate all of the power in the central government at the capitol city. In 1836 Travis was in command of the fort, with only 144 men and 14 cannons. He called for Santa Anna's surrender but the dictator ran up a blood-red flag proclaiming "No Quarter!" We know the story after that. 

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County Records of 8 Genealogy Websites

Alabama
Georgia
Kentucky
North Carolina
Virginia
South Carolina
Tennessee



Bundle and Save BUNDLE RATE for 8. Access to all eight websites plus additional data in other States: Bibles, genealogies, civil war records, colonial records, marriages, wills, estates, special collections, books written by renowned Georgia genealogist Jeannette Holland Austin.

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